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Visit to Cirencester Amphitheatre

Recently, the kids and I have had lots of fun trying to identify interesting features by looking at maps of our local area. It is amazing just how much of our history is recorded within maps, we have even discovered there is a site of a castle just a couple of miles away from our house, which we never knew was there. One site that the kids have been really keen to visit since they spotted it, is Cirencester Amphitheatre - the aerial photo below is a screenshot we took from OS Maps, and as you can see it looks a really impressive feature from above.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

Cirencester Amphitheatre Aerial View from OS Maps

Cirencester Amphitheatre is a scheduled ancient monument which was located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, and is thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. The second largest city in Roman Britain, Corinium had a population of over 10,000 people and is believed to have been a very fine Roman town indeed, with an array of large public stone buildings, two market places, and numerous shops and private houses. Thought to have been a centre for both stone carving and the mosaic industry, archaeological evidence also suggests that bakers, glass makers, blacksmiths and goldsmiths all worked within it's walls. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use. The artistic impression below is from the information board at the site, and is of how historians think the amphitheatre might have looked when it was in use.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

And this is what you can see on the ground today.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

Of course the mind-blowing fact that we were standing on 2,000 years of history didn't stop the kids running up and down the slopes endlessly - you can only imagine how many other parents have stood watching their kids as I did today, since it was first built.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

Here is a short video to try and give you a sense of the scale of the earthworks

Next to the earthworks a community woodland site has been set up. More and more of these community green spaces are being set up by collaborative partnerships for the benefit of local communities, and we had lots of fun exploring this one.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

As usual, checking trees for climbability featured high on the kid's agenda.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

We think the amphitheatre is well worth a visit, it is open in daylight hours, and entrance is free. If you are visiting Cirencester we would also recommend the Corinium Museum which has a stunning collection of Roman artifacts, and is a great hands on family museum with the most amazing tea shop next door.

 

The kids and I visited Cirencester Amphitheatre, a scheduled ancient monument located just outside the Roman walled city of Corinium, thought to have been built at the beginning of the second century. Found on the outskirts of the Cotswold town of Cirencester, the massive earthworks of the amphitheatre include banks 25 foot high, and it has been estimated that the structure held 8,000 spectators when it was in use.

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4 Comments

  • Reply Mary-the boondocks blog

    What a spectacular place to visit Sarah. I can only imagine how big it must have been. And to think that it was that old… standing on history indeed.
    Mary-the boondocks blog recently posted…Snowy Mountains of GreeceMy Profile

    February 21, 2017 at 12:02 am
    • Reply Sarah - Craft Invaders

      You must be walking on ancient history all the time Mary in beautiful Greece. My kids absolutely love Greek mythology, my son seems to know everything about the Greek gods and who ate/threw up/married/tricked whom!

      February 23, 2017 at 12:12 pm
  • Reply Kim

    Great right up on the amphitheatre and Querns Wood. I live near there and love going for walks around the area.

    February 19, 2017 at 5:36 pm
    • Reply Sarah - Craft Invaders

      Thanks Kim, it’s amazing how much history we have on our doorstep isn’t it – it’s a beautiful area 🙂

      February 23, 2017 at 11:09 am

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