How to Make Amazing Orange Marmalade with Frozen Fruit

by Sarah - Craft Invaders

All my extended family love Seville orange marmalade, so each year I make a batch to give away as Christmas Pressies.

The season for Seville oranges is really short. The fruit appears in the supermarkets sometime in December or early January, and finishes in February, making it touch and go whether you’ll even find it in the shops before Christmas.

My solution is making my easy orange marmalade recipe using frozen fruit. I am sure that there are people who will be horrified at the thought of marmalade made with frozen fruit, but for me, it is the perfect solution.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

 

Can you really freeze oranges?

Not only can you freeze Seville oranges, there’s several very good reasons why you should.

Firstly, the fruit is frozen in optimum condition rather than sitting in the fridge for weeks waiting for a moment of domestic goddess inspiration to strike.

Secondly, however green and ugly looking the fruit is when it goes into the freezer, it always comes out the most beautiful, even orange colour. Seville oranges need a cold snap to ripen fully, which is why they are available during the Christmas period.

And finally, it allows you to take advantage of any price reductions you might spot while doing the weekly shop.

The method I always use for making my orange marmalade involves cooking the fruit whole (Mary Berry’s recipe from ‘The Aga Book’), and so I simply throw the frozen Seville oranges straight in the pan.

Please note this easy marmalade recipe works equally well with both fresh and frozen Seville oranges.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

How to Make Amazing Seville Orange Marmalade with Frozen Fruit

  • 1kg Seville Oranges fresh or frozen weight.
  • 1 Lemon.
  • 2kg White Sugar.
  • 1350mls Water.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

Place the Seville oranges and the juice of the lemon in a large pan and cover with the water, using a plate to keep the oranges submerged.

Bring to the boil, and put a lid on the pan. At this point I transfer the pan to the simmering oven of my Aga which runs at about 130 C (depending what mood it is in). You can also make this orange marmalade recipe in a conventional oven, on a hob or in a slow cooker.

Leave to poach until tender (about 2 hours). The convenience of cutting up the softened fruit in the next step makes this initial cooking time well worth the wait.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

Once the oranges are tender, remove from the pan and drain, reserving the liquid.

When the fruit is cool enough to handle, cut each orange in half and scoop out all the seeds and pith.

Place all the insides you have scooped out back into the pan with the reserved liquid and boil for 6 mins, uncovered.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

Strain this liquid through a sieve, using a spoon to push the pulp through. The pulp contains the Pectin which will give your marmalade a good set, so it is important to push as much as you can through (see photo above).

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

Cut up the peel of the cooked Seville oranges as thick or thin as you like.

Return it to the pan with the pulpy liquid and sugar. Stir over a gentle heat until the sugar dissolves, then boil rapidly for about 20 mins until setting point is reached (105C on a preserving thermometer).

If you don’t have a thermometer, spoon a little marmalade onto a saucer that has chilled in the freezer. Leave for 30 seconds, then push with your finger. If the marmalade wrinkles and doesn’t flood to fill the gap, it is ready.

Take the marmalade off the heat, and leave it to sit for 10 mins. This gives the marmalade a chance to start to thicken, preventing the rind floating to the top when you pour it into your jars.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

Pour into clean, dry, hot jars that have been sterilised in a warm oven. I use clean, screw on lids for my preserves rather than waxed discs. This recipe makes 8 x 250ml jars of delicious Seville orange marmalade.

Stored in a cool dark place, Seville orange marmalade should keep well for at least a year.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

 

Homemade Orange Marmalade is a truly wonderful thing, and despite the seemingly long cooking time this is the easiest and tastiest marmalade recipe I have tried.

If you want to enjoy the taste of Seville Oranges in a glass try our Mouth-watering Seville Orange Gin. And if you are looking for more preserves inspiration why not check out our Rose Hip and Crab Apple Jelly and Pear Piccalilli recipes.

I have linked up this recipe at the fabulous Weekend Potluck.

 

Make amazing Seville Orange Marmalade using our fabulous easy to follow recipe which uses frozen fruit straight from the freezer!

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60 comments

Stephen Harwood November 18, 2019 - 3:00 pm

Hi,
I am an avid marmalade maker and love my product to have as much peel as possible.
We have 2 lemon trees so have access to untreated lemons all year round and freeze the unused rind for inclusion in my marmalade.
As Christmas approaches the easy peelers come on the market and I freeze the peel from these for the marmalade also.
I am concerned about the post harvest chemicals i.e. Imazalil and Pyrimethanil and the wax used getting into the marmalade.
I generally do not buy organic fruit and do not know if even these have the chemicals on them.
Have you any ideas about the risks as I make and consume a lot of marmalade in a year.
I use the big olive and pickled onion jars and one of these will last me a week or two if I’m careful.
Thank you,
Stephen Harwood

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders November 18, 2019 - 4:48 pm

Hi Stephen what an interesting question. I’m afraid I’m not really knowledgeable enough to answer though. I believe here in the UK shops have to label if their fruit has been treated with one of the permitted pesticides and also in the case of oranges (but not all citrus fruit) label the peel as inedible if any chemicals have been used on them. I’m guessing you aren’t in the UK if you have lemon trees to harvest from so all I can do is suggest reaching out to the shop you buy your fruit from and ask them. As I understand it if you do buy organic fruit that wont have been treated with anything and that is what I personally go for marmalade making. Hope you manage to get some answers! Best wishes 🙂

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