How to Weave a Simple Willow Wreath

by Sarah - Craft Invaders

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks from our Weeping Willow tree. 

The resulting willow ring can be displayed as it is, used as a wreath base or even turned into a gorgeous willow flower crown.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath flower crown with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

What do you need to make a willow wreath?

All you need to make a willow wreath is a dozen freshly cut, slender willow whips and a pair of Secateurs. We’ve got weeping willow trees in our garden so we use them. Standard willow works just the same. If it is dried make sure you soak it first of the stems may split.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

What else can I weave a natural wreath out of?

There are lots of natural materials that lend themselves to weaving wreaths. Trying shaping twigs and vines into a hoop shape as shown in the instructions below. If the material is supple enough to bend into a hoop you are good to go.

Here are a few ideas to get you started.

  • Flexible Twigs such as Dogwood, Hazel, Cotoneaster, Beech and winter-flowering jasmine.
  • Roots
  • Stems such as brambles and Raspberry
  • Vines. Grapevine, Clematis and Ivy all make wonderful wreaths

 

 

How to Make a Willow Wreath

We started by cutting lengths of this year’s growth from our Weeping Willow. You can see from the photos that the bark is still a wonderful mix of yellow and green.  It’s worth bearing in mind that all plants are much more flexible during their growing period when they are full of sap.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

We stripped the leaves from the willow stems, leaving us with lengths that were approximately 1 – 1.5m long. These young willow sticks are very pliable which makes them perfect for weaving. Earlier in the year we cut some  to make these rustic willow balls, which we used as bird feeders.

 

Willow Balls are really simple to make, and are a lovely rustic ornament that can be used in a number of ways.

 

Weaving a willow wreath is very simple.

Start with the thicker sticks, and finish with the thinner.

Take the first stick and weave it into a rustic hoop the diameter you want your wreath to be. Leave the tail piece from where you started sticking out of your ring (as shown in the photo below).

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

Add the second stick to the ring a quarter turn away from the first. Again, leave the tail sticking out for the time being.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

Continue turning your wreath and adding sticks. You will find that the willow wreath becomes rigid and takes shape very quickly.

This photo shows our wreath after we have added, and woven in, the third stick.

Note: If I am making flower crowns I stop at this stage.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

As you add more sticks, you will find that the wreath holds itself together under tension, and it’ll be easy to tuck in the smaller ends as you weave.

The tails will start to lie flat and incorporate into the wreath as you add more sticks. Don’t worry about any that continue to stick out, as these can be trimmed off at the end.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

When you are happy with the size of your wreath, trim off any tails and stragglers, using a pair of secateurs. Add a final couple of sticks to the wreath, this time tucking both ends into the weave, to give a neat finish.

Stand back and admire your handiwork!

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

How to use your willow wreath

Use your DIY willow wreath in it’s fresh, green state or dry it to use in future projects.

The willow wreath base will darken over time as it dries. Kept in dry conditions it should last for many years.

Ours is currently hanging in our shed drying out, while we decide what we are going to use it for.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

Willow is a brilliant, free craft material that is so easy to use. Over the past few years we have made hundreds of  willow flower crowns with children at festivals we volunteer at. They literally take minutes to make, and look gorgeous.

 

In this simple tutorial, we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic Flower Crown.

 

If we’ve inspired you try out some crafts using willow, check out the selection of some of our favourite willow crafts at the bottom of this post.

 

In this simple tutorial we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow wreath with sticks taken from our weeping willow tree.

 

How to Make an Easy Rustic Willow Cone

This willow cone is simple to make and can be used as a base for all sorts of crafts as well as making a wonderful, rustic plant support for the garden.

 

This willow cone is simple to make and could be used as a base for all sorts of crafts as well as making a wonderful, rustic plant support for the garden.

 

How to Make Easy Rustic Willow Balls

Willow Balls are really simple to make, and are a lovely rustic ornament that can be used in a number of ways.

 

Willow Balls are really simple to make, and are a lovely rustic ornament that can be used in a number of ways.

 

How to Weave a Beautiful Willow Crown

In this simple tutorial, we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic willow crown which you can then decorate with flowers.

 

In this simple tutorial, we show you how to weave a beautiful, rustic Flower Crown.

 

How to Make a Wonderful Succulent Christmas Tree

We turned our simple home-made willow cone into a wonderful Succulent Christmas Tree.

This wonderful centrepiece can be used both in the house and garden, and would also make a fabulous original gift.

 

We turned our simple home-made willow cone into a wonderful Succulent Christmas Tree - This wonderful centrepiece can be used both in the house and garden, and would make a fabulous original gift.

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20 comments

Sophie Spence July 17, 2020 - 11:50 am

Hi I love these and have a willow tree in my garden and wanting to use the willow branches to make things like the balls and wreaths or stars maybe to decorate a tipi for my wedding. Just wondering though If i do them now with green branches would they be ok still next May? do they dry out or do they go mouldy – can’t seem to find anything about this… thanks for any advise.

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders July 17, 2020 - 1:43 pm

Congratulations on your wedding Sophie. They wont go mouldy (as long as you keep them in a well ventilated place – hung up in a shed or similar) but they will lose the green colour and turn brown as they dry (wicker basket colour). If you wanted to make them now you could always paint them once they had dried out or spray them with glitter.

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Gemma October 24, 2017 - 11:17 pm

Hi Sarah why don’t you spray paint grey or white? You can also glue things on them for Christmas

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Sarah - Craft Invaders October 29, 2017 - 5:36 pm

That’s a great idea Gemma, thanks 🙂

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Who did what, where and how in September | HIBS100 October 10, 2016 - 11:36 am

[…] off was this wonderfully zingy green fresh willow wreath from Craft Invaders. Have a look at their site for full instructions – this one could definitely come in handy […]

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Sarah - Craft Invaders October 13, 2016 - 12:10 pm

Thank you so much for featuring our wreath 🙂

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Nikki Frank-Hamilton August 29, 2016 - 12:52 am

I love this! What a great shape and color. It would work well in any decor and style, you could decorate it in so many ways! What a fun project, now I have to find a willow tree to raid of their branches! This would look so great in many rooms of our house! And really great on our front door.

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 31, 2016 - 11:58 am

Thanks Nikki, willow is a beautiful tree – I believe we got the weeping willow from you guys so hopefully you’ll find one near you 🙂

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Katrin August 24, 2016 - 9:11 pm

I absolutely love it, the simplicity and that green! Gorgeous! Simple is best!!

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 25, 2016 - 4:29 pm

The green is lovely, although it’ll change over time – but you have just given me an idea of how I might be able to preserve the colour, so thank you Katrin!

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Sarah Jean August 24, 2016 - 2:46 pm

I am such a fan of wreaths! especially because I live in an apartment and feel like it’s one of the few ways I can make our place stand out/feel more like home. This one is particularly fresh looking!

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 25, 2016 - 4:26 pm

I love the look of a wreath on a door too – here in the UK they are only popular at Christmas, but I think they are lovely all year around 🙂

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Sarah Jean August 23, 2016 - 7:20 pm

Ah so simple and pretty – I love it! I am a big fan of wreaths.

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 25, 2016 - 4:23 pm

They are lovely aren’t they Sarah Jean 🙂

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Brianna August 23, 2016 - 6:49 pm

I bet these would also make excellent basis for willow crowns. Love the look and can’t wait to see it fully dried!

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 25, 2016 - 4:23 pm

I’m sure they would Brianna, I’m a little sorry it wont stay green – be lovely for a spring wreath 🙂

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Ilka August 23, 2016 - 4:34 pm

Sarah – this wreath is absolutely stunning in its simplicity!

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 25, 2016 - 4:21 pm

Thanks Ilka, it does look lovely in its green form 🙂

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Michelle August 23, 2016 - 4:20 pm

Great tutorial and stunning pictures, I was enthralled all the way around. Can’t wait to see what you do with it when it’s dried out.

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Sarah - Craft Invaders August 25, 2016 - 4:20 pm

Thanks Michelle. I haven’t decided what we’ll use it for yet – will have to wait for inspiration to strike!

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