How to Make Easy Reusable Beeswax Wraps

by Sarah - Craft Invaders

Home-made, reusable beeswax food wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use.

This year our family plans to dramatically reduce our use of single-use plastics. One simple way to do so is by replacing our plastic wrap and food bags with home-made reusable food wrap.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

We all know the impact that single-use plastic is having on our planet. 40% of plastic produced across the world is packaging, used just once and then discarded. (National Geographic, 2018).

Not only is plastic production and waste terrible for the environment, but the chemicals in plastic can also find their way into our food and drinks. The World Health Organization has shown that exposure to these toxins can pose potential health risks with some plastic food packaging being cited as of particular concern.

So what can we do to reduce the impact of single-use plastics on our environment and our health? There is no doubt that plastic materials can be incredibly useful, but there are also areas in which their use can be reduced. With the added concern of the health risks of plastic contamination in our food, our use of it during food preparation, storage and transportation seems an obvious place to start.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

This is my fridge after a typical weekend. Lots of leftovers stored ready to be used up just as my mother did before me. All protected (or so I’ve always thought) with a clean layer of plastic wrap to keep my food fresh.

Our lunch boxes are a similar story. Sandwiches carefully wrapped so not to let their contents contaminate the kid’s fruit and other snacks. Lots of single-use plastic – one of the most significant problems facing our environment today, and a simple place to make changes.

There’s definitely plenty of scope to reduce our plastic use by introducing reusable food wrap into our household!

 

 

What we Used to Make our Easy Reusable Beeswax Wraps

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

Men’s Cotton Handkerchiefs (Amazon affiliate link).
Beeswax Beads (Amazon affiliate link).
• Baking tray and parchment.
• Old, clean paintbrush.

Reusable beeswax wraps are both cheap and straightforward to make at home. You can use any tightly woven thin cotton fabric to make the waxed covers such as old cotton sheets and make them any size and shape you want. We used a pack of 11 inch square men’s handkerchiefs for ours which were an unwanted present received at Christmas. They are the perfect size for wrapping a sandwich.

I used unrefined beeswax beads to make our reusable food wraps. It is possible to use beeswax blocks and grate them yourself, but this is quite a task so if you do buy the wax specifically for this project using the pellets makes this project much more straightforward.

How to Make Easy Reusable Beeswax Wraps

Before I started making our Beeswax  wraps, I popped our handkerchiefs through a hot wash to remove any coating they might have on them.

Line an old baking tray with baking parchment and lay the cotton piece you are using on top.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of Beeswax beads evenly across the fabric’s surface, before popping into a low oven (about 140 C) to melt. I checked the progress every few minutes for the first one I made and found that mine needed about 8 minutes for the wax to melt completely.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

Once the wax has melted remove the baking sheet from the oven. You can use the paintbrush to ensure you have an even covering of wax across the cotton square before it starts to set if you need to. I found the heat from the baking sheet kept the wax melted long enough to do this if I worked quickly.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

Hang your beeswax wraps up to set. I hung mine over a piece of string suspended between two chairs. They only take a few minutes for the wax to harden.

Using and Caring for Reusable Beeswax Wraps

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

Beeswax wraps make great coverings for dishes and bowls. Holding the cover in place over the top of your container will allow the heat from your hands to mould the wax cloth to its shape and cling to the edges.

Beeswax is naturally antibacterial, so beeswax wraps can be wrapped directly around foods to preserve and protect them. We are using ours to wrap around sandwiches, cheese and cut vegetables with great success. The only item they should not come directly in contact with is raw meat.

To clean reusable wraps wash in cool water with a mild detergent and a sponge or soft brush and leave to dry. The wraps will take on a creased look over time. You can quickly refresh your beeswax wraps if you wish by returning them to the oven and re-melting the wax.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use. #beeswax #beeswaxwraps #reduce #reuse #recycle #reduceReuseRecycle #singleUsePlastic

 

We think home-made reusable food wraps are one brilliant way to reduce the use of single-use plastic and we will be using ours for all our packed lunches.

 

Home-made, reusable beeswax food wraps are super easy to make at home and are a great way to reduce the amount of single-use plastic you use.

 

We love coming up with frugal crafts and homemade versions of things. If you have enjoyed our easy reusable beeswax wraps tutorial, why not check out some of our other crafts that will save you money. You can find a list of our favourites below.

 

How to make Brilliant DIY Fabric Paint at Home.

In this tutorial we show you how to make fabric paint from acrylic paint by adding household ingredients. The result is a DIY fabric paint that not only looks fabulous, but is also washable. You didn’t even need to set it with heat!

 

How to make fabric paint: In this tutorial we make our own brilliant diy fabric paint from acrylic paint simply by adding a couple of household ingredients.

 

Upcycled Soap – How to Make Soap the Frugal Way!

Try out soap making at home without having to buy lots of supplies. Follow our easy instructions using store-bought soap.

 

In this upcycled soap tutorial we show you how you can try out soap making at home with just a couple of items from the supermarket – you may even have them in your cupboard at home already!

 

We test the best homemade reed diffuser oil recipes

Love Reed Diffusers but not the price? We test 3 homemade reed diffuser oil recipes to find out which works best, and if any of them are as good as the expensive ones you see in the shops.

 

Love Reed Diffusers but not the price? We test 3 homemade reed diffuser oil recipes to find out which works best, and if any of them are as good as the expensive ones you see in the shops. #essentialoils #homefragrance #reeddiffuser airfreshener #DIYReedDiffuser

 

How to Make Colourful, Recycled Gift Bows.

Our colourful, recycled gift bows are one small way to cut the cost of packaging this Christmas. Made from junk mail and old magazines they are super simple to make but look just as fabulous as anything you might buy in the shops.

 

Our colourful, recycled gift bows are one small way to cut the cost of packaging this Christmas. Made from junk mail and old magazines they are super simple to make but look just as fabulous as anything you might buy in the shops.

related articles

Leave a Comment

* By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

14 comments

Debi May 7, 2019 - 4:33 pm

Brilliant! I saw bees wax cloth advertised and thought it was very unique…but much prefer to make my own. Plus make as gifts for others.
Wouldn’t it be a great gift for jus about any occasion ! Was thinking muslin and love the idea of new hankies. Thank you very much. Debi

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders May 19, 2019 - 6:55 pm

Thank you so much for your kind comment Debi, they make great gifts 🙂

Reply
Denise February 2, 2019 - 12:21 pm

We have blocks of beeswax kept from when we used to keep bees. I shall be making some of these wraps and try to encourage family and friends to try using them too. Brilliant gift idea! Thanks.

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders March 10, 2019 - 10:35 pm

Oh I want to keep bees, Denise. What a lovely thing to make with your own beeswax 🙂

Reply
Zoe at SplodzBlogz January 18, 2019 - 9:46 am

Ah brilliant – I have been looking at buying some of these as clingfilm is next on my list to get rid of, but I reckon I can make these instead. Thanks for the instructions!

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders January 22, 2019 - 7:44 pm

You are very welcome Zoe, we’re definitely using far less clingfilm thanks to them 🙂

Reply
Carolyn Clark January 17, 2019 - 1:03 am

Would it be possible to use the beeswax hand bath I have to dip the fabric in?

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders January 22, 2019 - 7:45 pm

I think you’d end up with too much wax on the fabric Carolyn, really you want the wax you put on to soak in. I suspect any excess would crack and flake off.

Reply
Diane January 16, 2019 - 8:45 pm

I will Definitely make some of these. I have a bolt of muslin(please let me know if you don’t think muslin will work) that I hope will work well, and, I can do several sizes. Thank you for this info. Diane

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders January 22, 2019 - 7:46 pm

Hi Diane. I think as long as the muslin is a tight weave it will work well – Do come back and let us know 🙂

Reply
Laurie January 16, 2019 - 2:09 pm

Thanks for the handkerchief idea!

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders January 22, 2019 - 7:46 pm

You are very welcome Laurie, thanks for taking the time to comment 🙂

Reply
Jan January 16, 2019 - 1:43 pm

The samples shown in the refrigerator look clear, but the end products shown are all opaque . How are they made see-thru?

Reply
Sarah - Craft Invaders January 16, 2019 - 2:03 pm

Hi Jan. The fridge photo shows me using plastic wrap as an example of how much I was using before. The beeswax wraps will always be the colour of the cloth you use to make them 🙂

Reply